U.S. weather extremes in 2011 and their impacts: some numbers

Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

40 U.S. cities experienced their hottest summer on record in 2011.

A record-high 99 Federal major disaster declarations in 2011….

Weather Extremes

40: Number of U.S. cities that experienced their hottest summer on record in 2011.
Source: http://extremeweatherguide.com/updates.asp

40: Number of U.S. cites that recorded their hottest single month on record in 2011.
Source: http://extremeweatherguide.com/updates.asp

12: Number of U.S. cities that recorded their all-time hottest temperature on record in 2011. Source: http://extremeweatherguide.com/updates.asp

58: The record high percentage of the U.S. experiencing either extremely-wet or extremely-dry conditions during 2011.
Source: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/extremes/cei/graph/3c/01-12

1,049: The record number of cooling degree days in the U.S. during the summer of 2011.  Source: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/societal-impacts/redti/USA/aug/3-month

#1: Summer 2011 was the hottest on record for the Mississippi-Louisiana-Texas-Arkansas-Oklahoma-Kansas 6-state area combined.
63: The record percentage of the 6-state area experiencing  weather extremes during the summer  of 2011
53: The record percentage of the Southeast, experiencing weather extremes in the summer of 2011.
Source: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/extremes/cei/graph/so/06-08/cei

#1: 2011 was the driest year on record for Texas.
Source: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/temp-and-precip/time-series/index.php?parameter=pcp&month=12&year=2011&filter=ytd&state=41&div=0

Impacts

99:  The record number of Federal major disaster declarations in 2011.
Source: http://www.iii.org/assets/docs/ppt/Federal%20Disaster%20Declarations.ppt

$72.8 billion: Total estimated catastrophe losses in the United States in 2011, most of which resulted from extreme weather events.
$46 billion: Estimate damages from severe thunderstorms in 2011.  Insured losses exceeded $25 billion, more than twice the previous record.
$10 billion: Estimated economic losses from Hurricane Irene in 2011.
$2 billion: Estimated economic losses from lower Mississippi floods of 2011.
$8 billion: Estimated costs of Texas drought in 2011.
Source: 2011 Natural Catasrophe Year in Review, 4 January 2012, Munich Re, http://www.ctnow.com/media/acrobat/2012-01/67158951.pdf

6,170,593:  Acres burned by wildfires in the southern tier of states (excluding southern California) in 2011 (10 year average: 2,160,542 acres).
Source: http://www.predictiveservices.nifc.gov/intelligence/2011_statssumm/Annual_Report_2011.pdf

$5.2 billion: Estimated agricultural losses of the Texas drought in 2011. Additional indirect losses to the agricultural sector could add another $3.5 billion.
3.8 million: The number of acres burned in Texas from Nov. 15, 2010 through Sept. 29, 2011.  2,763 homes were destroyed by the fires.
Source: The Impact of the 2011 Drought and Beyond, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, February 6 2012.

100-500 million: Estimated number of trees with diameters of 5 inches or larger killed in Texas as a result of the ongoing drought in 2011.
Source: http://txforestservice.tamu.edu/main/popup.aspx?id=14954

$2 billion: Estimated costs for Corps of Engineers to repair damage to levees, dams and riverbanks from 2011 floods — excluding the damage from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.
Source: Corps Pegs 2011 Flood Damage to Levees at $2B, Insurance Journal, 19 Sep 2011. http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2011/09/19/216381.htm

h/t Nick Sundt

Earlier posts:

IPCC says essential actions needed to reduce risks of changing climate extremes

“As the Costs of Extreme Weather Rise, Americans Cannot Afford Denial”

Talking about the Texas disasters — climate and political

 

 

This entry was posted in Global Climate Disruption and Impacts. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to U.S. weather extremes in 2011 and their impacts: some numbers

  1. Zorro says:

    How to recover Florida’s annual precipitation record data per year?

Comments are closed.