Presidential Climate Action Project “State of the Climate” statement calls for federal action

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In signing the Presidential Climate Action Project “State of the Climate” statement, Climate Science Watch joins Nobel Prize winners, leading scientists, elected leaders, heads of major environmental organizations, and others in urging the federal government to invest more in climate science, to seize the opportunity of an emerging global market for clean energy technologies, and to recognize that global warming is an economic, public health and national security issue. The statement was delivered to the White House, Congressional leaders, and presidential candidates.

The State of the Climate message was prepared by the Presidential Climate Action Project

State of the Climate: An assessment of climate change and policy in the United States
January 24, 2008

List of signers
Among the signatories are several leading American scientists, including officials of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the Federation of American Scientists and experts from Yale, Harvard, Duke and Princeton. 

The statement says 11 “critical developments must take place by the time the 44th President delivers the State of the Union address one year from now.” One of these is:

We must restore federal funding for Earth sciences and expand our research into the regional, local, social and economic impacts of climate change. The national Climate Change Science Program must produce the knowledge and deliver the information the American people need to mitigate, anticipate and adapt to the adverse impacts of global warming. We must engage the talents of our best scientists and engineers and restore respect for science in the federal government.

The Project, headquartered at the University of Colorado Denver, is producing a 100-day climate action plan for the next President. The project issued a preliminary plan on Dec. 4, 2007, and will provide presidential candidates with a final plan in September.

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